ClearCheckbook's Blog, News & Updates

The Next Big Update for ClearCheckbook - Version 5

10/30/2019 in ClearCheckbook News
The current version of ClearCheckbook (v4) was built on code and technologies from around 2009. While we still adhere to the latest in security and privacy measures, many of the frameworks and software versions we're using are getting old and will soon stop being supported. We've run into several cases where we want to implement a new feature or tool but are limited by our older code not being supported.

About a year ago we started planning a huge upgrade that will put ClearCheckbook on the latest frameworks with better infrastructure for future-proofing the site and apps. Our goal was to keep the front facing website (what you see and interact with on a daily basis) the same, all while taking advantage of the new framework to optimize speed, performance and security.

We’re finally at the point where we’re beginning testing of ClearCheckbook v5 on the same hosting platform the site is currently running on. We’ll be running v5 through a whole slew of testing over the next few months to make sure it’s ready for you to use.

Aside from having to rewrite the backend of the site, we’ve also taken this opportunity to add several new features, tools and updates.

New Features:

  • ‘Trusted Devices’ feature in conjunction with 2 factor authentication

  • Asset tracker - Manage and track assets such as homes, vehicles and other tangible assets.

  • Account Text Reports - reports similar to the Category text reports but for accounts.

  • Payee Text Reports - again, reports similar to the Category text reports but for payees.

  • Dark CSS theme - ClearCheckbook can be switched into dark mode to make it easier on the eyes

  • Net Worth Reports - See how your net worth has changed over the past 2 years with this new report.

  • ClearCheckbook Knowledge Base - We've rebuilt the Help / Support section to make a much more informative Knowledge Base with screenshots and much more detailed instructions on how to use the site.


Updates / Bug Fixes:

  • Auto-complete updated to show more information (such as which account/category will be auto-filled)

  • Ability to disable auto-complete auto-fill features so it only fills the text

  • Manually enter ‘last price’ for investments that aren’t automatically updated

  • Hide suggestions in the Import auto-categorization tool

  • Reminders will post deposits before withdrawals

  • Payee beta reports - ability to sort by sum column

  • Monthly Summary - fixed bug that was preventing accounts and categories from showing up alphabetically

  • Transaction History tool - link to view the current transaction so you can see what changed

  • Debt snowball - additional payments can now have a date associated with them

  • Reconcile tool - you can now edit or delete reconciliations

  • Separate withdrawals and deposits sums in a reconciliation report

  • If you change the number of transactions to view per page on the register, that setting is saved instead of resetting each time you log out.

  • Profit & Loss report - updated colors to make it easier to identify positive and negative numbers

  • Latest Transactions gadget - selection to view only transactions for a specific account

  • You can now categorize transfers when creating them

  • Updated how the 'lost password' form works to make it more secure

  • Budgets - you can now see a breakdown of how the amount spent is being calculated

  • Payee reports - export to CSV functionality

  • 2FA bypass - allows you to have a bypass code sent to a trusted contact method in case you can't access your authenticator app

  • Investment Portfolio - autocomplete for symbol and note fields in Add Investment form

  • Income Budgets - show the amount differently if you generate more income than the budget limit

  • Debt Snowball - you can now see how much you've paid toward principal and interest for each budget by expanding the history

  • Debt Snowball - you can now see which snowball methods will save you the most money or be paid off the fastest

  • Ability to assign all No Account transactions to an existing account from the search results page

  • Made it easier to delete all No Account transactions

  • Ability to quickly delete all expired reminders

  • Ability to turn an existing transaction into a recurring transaction

  • Tweaks + Bug fixes - Over 45 small tweaks and bug fixes to help make the site perform as expected


We’ve also greatly optimized and reduced the number of database calls made from each page load. This will help dramatically speed up the response time of the website.

As mentioned earlier, now that we’ve got the new version running on the same hosting platform as ClearCheckbook currently is, we’ll be doing our own internal testing. After we’re happy with that we’ll be asking for some beta testers to run the new code through its paces and look for any issues we might not have come across. We’ll keep you updated on progress as it goes on!

Updated on August 5, 2020 to reflect more updates and feature additions

2-Step Verification Now Available on ClearCheckbook

11/30/2018 in ClearCheckbook Updates

We've added an extra layer of protection to your login with 2-Step Verification

2-Step Verification, or Multi-factor authentication (MFA), is a widely used method for securing your data online. The ClearCheckbook MFA is opt-in, meaning you can enable this if you'd like to add an extra level of security to your login.

Our MFA relies on you scanning a QR code through a security / authenticator app on your phone. Once done, the app will have an entry for ClearCheckbook and a 6 digit code that changes every 30 seconds. When you sign into ClearCheckbook, you'll provide your username and password and then you'll be asked to provide the 6 digit code before you're signed into your account.

2-Step Verification for ClearCheckbook
Sample 2-Step Verification QR code


You can enable MFA by signing into your account and then click on Settings at the top right side of the page. Next, click on the 2-Step Verification link. Scan the QR code on this page with the MFA app of your choice and then enter the 6 digit code provided by the app to verify setup and enable MFA.

There are many widely used authenticator apps available that you can use with our MFA setup. Some of the most popular are: Google Authenticator, Microsoft Authenticator, Authy and LastPass Auth. Using our MFA will require you to have your mobile phone with you each time you manually sign into the site. Note: you won't be prompted to enter the 6 digit code if you have cookies enabled and remain signed into your account. The only time you'll be prompted for your MFA is each time you actually log in.

If you'd like to read more about what MFA is and why it's useful, check out these resources:

'Zero-Out' Method Reconciliation Tool Now Available

11/28/2018 in ClearCheckbook Updates

We've added a new reconciliation tool if Jiving isn't for you.

While we still stand behind ClearCheckbook's established reconciliation tool, Jiving, we've had many users want a more traditional way to reconcile their bank statements by zeroing out to their ending balance by selecting the transactions that appear on their statement.

The tool we built to handle this is called Zero-Out Reconciliation and can be found by clicking on the " Reconcile" link in the Account Options box at the top right side of the Transaction Register. We moved a few links around and now have the Reconcile link next to the Credit Card payment tool, Search and Export links in the Tools line.

Account Options screenshot
New layout of Account Options box (as seen by ClearCheckbook Premium members)


To quickly summarize how the Zero-Out Reconciliation tool works: you'll select an account, statement end date and the ending balance for the statement. Once done, the site will find all unjived transactions for that account. You'll select the transactions from the statement and at the end the difference between the ending balance and the selected amount should be zero.

Once you've zeroed out the statement, clicking the Reconcile button will jive all the transactions and save the statement details (with an optional memo) to your reconciliation history.

We wrote an extensive step-by-step guide that walks you through how to use the Zero-Out Reconciliation tool as well as provides some common issues and fixes for if your statement doesn't zero-out. This walkthrough can be found here: Zero-Out Reconciliation help (note: you must be logged in and have an active ClearCheckbook Premium membership to see this page / use the new tool)

Zero-Out Reconciliation Sample: The arrows point out a successfully zeroed out statement.
Zero-Out Reconciliation sample

This is new reconciliation tool is available to all ClearCheckbook Premium members. If you haven't upgraded to ClearCheckbook Premium, we encourage you to check out the included upgrades and features here. ClearCheckbook Premium upgrades are how we can keep ClearCheckbook constantly growing and improving. Please consider an upgrade if you haven't already!

Refinancing Your Auto, Student or Home Loans Can Help Save You Money

8/1/2017 in Money Management Tips

Refinancing your loans can be a way to help reduce your monthly payments and help minimize the amount of interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan.

Whether you’re looking to refinance automotive, home or student loans, they each come with pros and cons. This ClearCheckbook Money Management Tips post will help you figure out if refinancing is right for you. Keep in mind that refinancing at the beginning of your loan while you’re still paying heavily toward interest is the best time to refinance. The closer you get to paying off your loan, the less a refinance might help.

The three most common types of loans you might have are automotive, student and home. Each of these loans has different requirements and fees associated with refinancing. We’ll cover each of these loan types and go into whether refinancing the loan might be right for you.

Why you might consider refinancing:
It might be wise to research refinancing your loans if you’ve match any of these criteria:

1. Your credit score has improved since taking the loan.
The interest rate you get on your loans usually has a very strong correlation to your credit score. If you took out a loan while your credit score was low (699 or below) but your credit score has raised up into the 700’s or higher, your chance of getting a lower interest rate is a lot higher than if your credit score was still low.

2. Interest rates have dropped since you took out the loan.
Interest rates have been at historic lows recently, but they fluctuate all the time. Assuming your credit score remained the same, refinancing when interest rates drop 1% or more from what you’re currently paying could mean a big reduction in monthly bills and interest over the term of the loan.

3. You didn’t get a good interest rate, even though you had good credit.
Just because you had good credit doesn’t mean you got the best rate when you took out your loan. Whatever the circumstances were, if you ended up with a higher rate than you think you can get now, refinancing at a lower rate could be a good choice.

4. Your financial situation has changed and you need to lower your monthly payment.
If you’ve run into some hard times financially and need access to as much cash as possible, then refinancing could potentially help get you some extra money each month.

5. You want to change your loan duration (eg: going from a 30 year fixed to a 15 year fixed mortgage).
Refinancing with a shorter term loan can help save you lots of money in interest over the term of the loan. If you’re financially stable enough and would like to pay off your home quicker, refinancing to a shorter loan term could be a good choice.

6. You’re currently facing hard times and need to reduce your monthly payments
Refinancing a loan doesn’t have to be entirely about saving money in the long term. Refinancing can also be a great option if you’re going through tough times financially and need to lower your monthly payments. This can usually be done by refinancing your loans for a longer duration. The downside is you’ll probably end up paying more over the course of the loan, but it can help alleviate any immediate financial issues. Then, when you get yourself back on solid ground you can work on refinancing again or paying off the loans faster.

How does refinancing a loan work?
No matter what kind of loan you have, refinancing works by taking out a new loan to pay off your old one. This new loan comes with a new interest rate and terms. You can refinance through your existing loan holder or with a different company. When refinancing, it’s always good to shop around and try to find a lender with the best rates and terms that fit your needs.

Automotive Loan Refinancing
Compared with other types of loans, refinancing an auto loan is about as easy as it gets. There is no appraisal and usually no fees associated with refinancing your auto loan. Credit unions usually offer some of the best interest rates when it comes to refinancing auto loans. The credit unions might require you to create a checking or savings account with them if you don’t already have one.

Assuming you meet one or more of the criteria above in the "Why you might consider refinancing" section, one of the first things you’ll want to do is get the current payoff amount from your existing lender. This is the amount left on your current loan and is the amount you’ll use when refinancing. If the payoff amount is higher than the value of your car then you might have trouble getting a new lender to refinance your loan.

You can find out how much you can potentially save by using a calculator like Bankrate’s auto loan calculator to determine what your new monthly payment might be and then subtract that amount from what you’re currently paying each month.

Like we mentioned earlier, refinancing in the first half of your loan’s term is going to save you the most monty since during that time you’re mostly paying interest. After that you’ll be paying more toward principal and refinancing will have less of a benefit.

If you need to lower your monthly payment but your payoff amount is worth more than the value of your car or you can’t find a lender to give you a new loan at a lower interest rate, you can try negotiating with your current lender to lower the rate or to extend the term of the loan. Extending the duration of your loan means you’ll be paying more in interest over time but it could lower your monthly payments.

Student Loan Consolidation / Refinancing
Before we get into the details a little more, let’s clear up what the difference between consolidation and refinancing is. Student loan consolidation is combining multiple student loans into one single loan. This makes it easier to have one monthly payment at one interest rate instead of multiple loans at varying rates. Consolidation takes the weighted average of your interest rates to come up with the new rate. Student loan refinancing on the other hand works by taking one loan out to pay off all of your existing loans, leaving you with just one payment. Refinancing has the benefit of letting you seek out better interest rates and loan terms.

Student Loan Consolidation
Like we said above, consolidation simply takes all of your existing loans and consolidates them into one single loan using a weighted average of your interest rates to determine the new rate. Consolidation can be done with federal loans through a Direct Consolidation Loan. By doing this you’ll keep all the benefits of your federal loans and might be necessary for enrollment in federal programs such as income-based repayment plans. Another drawback is that you cannot consolidate private and federal loans into a single loan.

Consolidation won’t save you any money and could potentially cost you more in interest. Consolidation makes sense if you’re struggling to pay your minimum requirements each month and want to extend the terms of your loan. You might also become eligible for income-driven repayment plans where you pay less each month if you’re not making much money, but more once you start earning more.

Student Loan Refinancing
Refinancing is a way to take out a new private loan to pay off all your existing student loans. There is no federal loan refinancing program so you’ll have to use a private lender which means you might miss out on any federal loan benefits you might be receiving. Loan refinancing has the added benefit of letting you negotiate a lower interest rate and different repayment terms which has the potential to save you a lot of money in interest.

Refinancing makes sense if you’re looking to lower your interest rates or switch to different repayment terms. Just like other loans, the rates and terms you’ll get will depend on your credit score and current income.

Why you shouldn’t refinance or consolidate your loans:
If you’re currently part of a loan forgiveness program through your work, you might want to skip refinancing or consolidating your loans or else the forgiveness terms might start over. You should check with your workplace to find out what the terms are for your specific loan forgiveness program. Additionally, loan consolidation might lead to the loss of some borrower benefits, such as interest rate discounts, principal rebates, or loan cancellation benefits as a result of switching lenders.

Home Loan / Mortgage Refinancing
Being one of the biggest purchases you can make with one of the longest repayment terms, a home loan can have a dramatic effect on your finances. This makes home loans a great option for refinancing in order to save you money each month.

Like other loan refinancing, when you refinance a home loan you’re taking out a new loan to pay off your old one. There are many reasons you might consider refinancing your home loan and may include lowering your interest rate, shortening the loan term, switching from/to an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM), consolidating debt or taking equity out on your home (cash out).

The old rule for refinancing a home loan was when the interest rate was 2% lower than what you’re currently paying. Now, most lenders will advise you to refinance even if you can only save 1% on your interest rate.

Home loan refinancing has a few drawbacks to consider. First, refinancing a home loan often includes closing costs that can be 3-6% of your mortgage. Second, you might be required to have an appraisal, title search and pay for application fees. All of these can be combined into an amount called the "break even point" which will help you determine if refinancing is right for you. The break even point is calculated by dividing the total closing costs by the amount you’ll save each month. For example, if you refinance and have $3,000 in closing costs and save $100 per month, it will take you 30 months, or 2.5 years, to break even on the cost of refinancing. If you plan on staying in your home longer than that then refinancing is probably a good option.

Another thing to consider is the rate and term of the new loan. It’s possible that refinancing your existing 30 year loan to a new 30 year loan could cost you more in interest over the lifetime of the loan. This is less of an issue if you refinance early on, but looking at these numbers will also help you figure out if refinancing is right for you.

Depending on your current interest rate and what the going rates are for loans, you could potentially switch from a 30 year fixed rate mortgage to a 15 year fixed rate mortgage with a much lower interest rate but not pay much more per month. This is the best way to dramatically reduce the amount of interest you’ll pay over the lifetime of the loan.

Cash-out or home equity loans are a different type of refinancing where you take out a new loan for more than your existing loan amount. You can then use the difference in amounts for home improvements, college tuition or paying off other debts. Keep in mind that you’ll still be paying interest on this money so using a home equity loan to pay off something like credit card debt will still result in paying interest on that. Another potential issue is transferring from an unsecured to a secured debt. If you miss a payment on your credit card you’ll lower your credit score and get calls from debt collectors. If you miss payments on your mortgage you’re at risk of foreclosure and losing your home entirely.

How much can refinancing save me?
While there are too many variables at play to give you a straight answer, there are many calculators available online that can help you determine if refinancing one of your loans is right for you. Simply do an online search for "xxxx loan refinancing calculator" and you’ll find several different tools that can help you make the decision. Keep in mind that refinancing isn’t always about saving you the most money. If you’re going through tough times and are having trouble paying your minimum monthly payments, refinancing at a longer term can help dramatically reduce those monthly payments while you get yourself back into a stable financial position.

This is part of our weekly Money Management Tips series that aims to help you take more control of your finances. This series gives tips on everything from tracking your spending to improving your credit score.

Save Money by Making Smarter Meal Choices

7/20/2017 in Money Management Tips

Cutting down on your food expenses is one of the easiest ways to save extra money each month.

In this blog post we’ll use some eating habits that we believe are about normal for a single adult living and working in the US. Then, we’ll show how you can save nearly $100 each week by simply doing a better job of buying and cooking your own food. Everyone is different and your daily habits might not fall in line with the example but we hope you can take some of these ideas and apply it to your situation.

Breakfast:


Expensive
Fast food breakfast on the way to work: egg muffin w/ coffee or juice = $5
Frugal
Similar breakfast at home: 2x eggs ($0.28), piece of toast ($0.20) and coffee ($0.22) = $0.70

This is a savings of $4.30 per day. If you don’t want to purchase a coffee maker, there are good and inexpensive alternatives for making a single cup such as the Aeropress or a french press. The cheapest solution would be to use instant coffee.

Lunch:


Expensive
Fast food combo meal = $8
Frugal
Pack your own lunch. There are a huge choice of options here but we’ll stick with an easy to prepare lunch. Sandwich w/ apple and chips. Water to drink = $3.35 ($0.40 for bread, $1.50 for meat, $0.20 for tomato, $0.10 for onion, $0.20 for lettuce, $0.70 for apple, $0.25 for chips)

This is a savings of $4.65 per day. While microwavable meals may seem cheap and easy, we don’t recommend them because they usually aren’t that filling and are generally not that healthy. Another great way to cut your lunch costs even more is to eat leftovers.

Snacks:


Expensive
Crackers or candy bar from vending machine = $1.00
Frugal
Buy snacks in bulk from the store instead of buying individually when hungry. For example, buy nuts in bulk for $4/lb = $0.50 per snack

This is a savings of $0.50 per day. Another alternative is to eat your lunch gradually throughout the afternoon so you don’t have to purchase additional food for snacking.

Dinner:


Expensive
Grabbing fast food or eating at a restaurant = $8-15
Frugal
Making a dinner that will last several days (see assumptions at bottom of post). Chicken, veggie mix and rice = $4.70

This is a savings of around $10 per day. The added benefit is you now have 2-3 extra meals for lunches or dinners later in the week. If you already eat dinner at home try to plan and cook meals that will last several days instead of buying a frozen dinner that will only last you one meal.

Adding all of this up will save you $19.45 per day. Over the course of a 5 day work week this will save you just shy of $100 per week. You can increase the amount saved by spending a couple hours once per week making a lot of food that you can refrigerate or freeze and then eat throughout the week. Investing in a slow cooker and making a hearty stew or slow cooking some meat and then pairing that with some rice and veggies makes for a filling and extremely cheap meal.

If you need to eat out at a restaurant, you can always save a couple of dollars by ordering water instead of a soda.

We recommend setting up your Spending Categories to really drill down into where your food spending is going. If you’re already categorizing all of your expenses then the next step is to set a budget for both your eating out and your groceries and work on spending less money eating out and shift that over to groceries where every dollar you spend goes much farther.

If you’ve changed your eating habits and have noticed the changes in your budgets, we’d love for you to share your experience in the comments!

Assumptions:
  • Breakfast:
    • 18 pack of eggs costs $2.50
    • 18 slice loaf of good bread costs $4
    • 1 lb of ground coffee costs $8 (36 servings per pound)
    • Assumes you already have butter / jam for toast
  • Lunch:
    • Costs for sandwich ingredients depend on how much you use per sandwich.
    • Drink water to save even more money
  • Dinner (enough for 3-4 meals):
    • 3 lbs chicken thighs @ 2.50/lb = $7.50
    • 1 onion = $1
    • 1 bell pepper = $1
    • 1 broccoli crown = $2
    • Box of seasoned rice = $2.50

This is part of our weekly Money Management Tips series that aims to help you take more control of your finances. This series gives tips on everything from tracking your spending to improving your credit score.

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